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dc.contributor.authorBishop, Kaila
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-22T15:35:49Z
dc.date.available2016-08-22T15:35:49Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/72085
dc.description.abstractStudies have shown that past actions can impact present and future actions. More specifically, inhibition of return (IOR) is a phenomenon in which participants respond slower to previously attended areas compared to novel locations (Posner & Cohen, 1984). IOR has been shown for eye movements, key presses and reaching but until now has not been investigated for grasping despite the prevalence of these actions. In this study, participants were asked to reach out and grasp a small or large block following the presentation of a central arrowhead cue indicating which direction to make a movement, while the eyes remained fixated centrally. Results showed slower reaction times for grasping movements made in the same direction as a preceding movement, demonstrating an IOR like effect. The grip scaling function however was not affected which adds to the growing body of evidence that IOR serves a broader function than facilitating visual search behaviour.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectAttentionen_US
dc.subjectInhibition of Returnen_US
dc.subjectGraspingen_US
dc.titleINHIBITORY CONSEQUENCES OF GRASPING MOVEMENTS: IS GRASPING THE SAME AS REACHING?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.date.defence2016-08-08
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Clinical Vision Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinerLeah Walshen_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorDarren Oystrecken_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerHeather Neyedlien_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerMaria Prydeen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorDavid Westwooden_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalReceiveden_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNoen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNoen_US
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